Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Great Lakes Agricultural Stewardship

By Fadi Didi

Animal welfare officials say they are investigating the alleged abuse of livestock at a property in Southwestern Ontario.

The Sarnia and District Humane Society says more than 60 animals were removed from the property about 50 kilometres southeast of Sarnia.

The humane society says it's alleged the animals were found suffering from severe neglect and cruelty and that many other animals were found dead on the property.

It did not say what kind of animals were removed, but said they are now under veterinary care. 

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Don Ciparis and Emery Huszka of the National Farmers Union-Ontario brought agricultural concerns to a meeting of International Joint Commission on the Great Lakes.

At the session in Sarnia last week, they told the members that the Great Lakes Agricultural Stewardship Initiative was promising, but it was completely underfunded.

Huszka and Ciparis also outlined how algae blooms in the Great Lakes are a societal problem and Ontario farmers are only one small piece of the puzzle.

In his presentation to the IJC, Ciparis cited a 2003 study which found that the dumping of dredged materials by the Army Corps of Engineers created its own algae blooms.

He says they need to make sure they are all working on the issue together.

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An Ontario's tomato growers and processors have struck a new deal.

Elmer Buchanan, who was appointed Trustee of the Ontario Processing Vegetable Growers Board. says both sides were willing to compromise in order to reach an agreement.

He says he looks forward to moving ahead with further talks.

Provincial Minister of Agriculture Jeff Leal, who appointed Buchanan once negotiations had stalled, says he's please that the board and Ontario's three biggest processors have reached an agreement for the 2017 growing season.

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A free-market think-tank suggests Canada could use its dairy sector as a bargaining chip to get a deal on softwood lumber exports to the U-S.

The Montreal Economic Institute says at the NAFTA talks, Canada could offer American negotiators more open trade in dairy in exchange for more predictable trade in softwood lumber.

The institute says eliminating trade barriers under supply management and in the softwood lumber sector would be good both for consumers and producers.

American lawmakers have already indicated they will press the Trump administration to gain more dairy trade when the North American Free Trade Agreement is renegotiated. 
 

 


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