Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Canada & US still Chipping Away at Lumber Deal

By Fadi Didi

The countries say they are going to continue negotiations to reach a new softwood lumber deal.


Length: 00:46

The Canadian and U.S. governments say they are going to continue negotiations in a bid to reach a new softwood lumber deal despite the end of a standstill agreement.
     
The statement came from Canadian Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman.
     
The two sides say they're committed to continuing talks in an effort to achieve a "durable and equitable'' deal.
     
The 2006 softwood lumber agreement expired a year ago, but a one-year standstill period began to allow both countries to come to some sort of resolution.
     
The expiry of the standstill period means the U.S. could begin the process of imposing tariffs on Canadian lumber imports.

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Meanwhile, Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay has wrapped up his first official visit to Mexico where he met with the Mexican Secretary of Agriculture.
    
The secretary and minister agreed to build on the two countries' long standing partnership in agricultural trade and discussed areas of opportunity to increase the competitiveness of Canadian and Mexican agricultural sectors.
   
Mexcico has just followed through on a on a promise that was made back in June to end restrictions on Canadian beef imports.
    
The restrictions were a lingering side effect of long-standing fears over mad-cow disease.

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Ontario's agriculture ministry says hay production was a challenge this year as the cool Spring stunted early growth.
    
Then the dry summer halted any further growth until the rain returned in August.
    
The province says hay inventories are below average, although the quality is high.
    
As a result, more corn was harvested for silage than originally planned and many farms are using straw and corn stover to extend feed stores. 

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And an analyst says the main trend is still down for corn, wheat and soybeans.
    
But Marty Hibbs with Grain Farmers of Ontario says the worst is over.
    
Hibbs says corn prices could rise another 20-to-30 cents and wheat is trading higher than it did on Labour Day.
    
He says the charts for soybean prices are not as encouraging.   

 

 


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