Country 105

 

     
Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Diplomats Fight For Canola Rules

By Fadi Didi

Rules governing shipments of Canadian canola to China will remain in place.


Length: 1:06

Canada's international trade minister says the rules governing shipments of Canadian canola to China will remain in place until both countries can reach a new agreement on acceptable import standards.
    
Chrystia Freeland says the Liberal government is committed to reaching a new canola regime with China as soon as possible.
    
In the meantime, however, she says the current rules will stand.
    
China had planned to enforce tighter regulations on the amount of foreign materials permitted in canola exports from Canada, but the deadline was lifted after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's visit this week.

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An Ontario tech company is getting funding from the Growing Forward 2 program to help reduce antibiotics in poultry.
   
AbCelex Technologies has received 3.4 million dollars to continue work on its anti-microbial feed additives.
   
The goal is to control salmonella and campylobacter in poultry products.
   
AbCelex says they've seen a 95 per cent inhibition in both.

They suggest their mark is far higher than that of other regulators.

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State officials say another case of bovine tuberculosis has been detected on a northern Michigan cattle farm.
   
The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development says the potentially fatal illness was confirmed in an Alcona County beef herd when one of the animals was tested before being moved to another place.
   
Sixty-six cattle herds in Michigan have been infected with bovine T-B since 1998.
   
Alcona County is one of four counties where cattle producers must test their herds for the disease annually and before they're moved.

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Meanwhile, with the wet conditions that have been prevalent in Manitoba this year, many cattle producers have had to deal with foot rot issues among livestock.
   
Foot rot is an infectious and painful condition of the foot found in cattle, sheep, and goats, that thrives in warm, moist conditions.
   
Dr. Wayne Tomlinson, an extension veterinarian with Manitoba Agriculture, says the disease is very contagious.
   
He says the weather conditions this year have been conducive for bacteria to spread.


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