Country 105

 

     
Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Upset With Neonics Policy

By Manny Paiva

Soil and Crop Association officials disappointed with new policy on neonic treated seeds.


Length: 1:12

Officials with the Ontario Soil and Crop Association say they're disappointed with the new policy on neonicotinoids.

They say any choices that further restrict the use of neo-nic treated seeds must be made in ways that build on the good will Ontario farmers have demonstrated in applying best practices.

Officials also say any such moves must assure a productive and profitable sector going forward.

The group pointed out Ontario's proposal appears to disregard the permitted use supported federally by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency.

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It appears the federal legislation designed to help issues with moving 2013's record crop is making a difference.

The independent monitor for Canada's grain handling and transportation system says things are moving smoothly for a majority of shippers.

But Mark Hemmes of Quorum Corporation says there are still some small issues to deal with.

He notes for people who sell grain in smaller blocks of rail cars, there are still some challenges going down into the U.S.

There are also issues over moving milling products into Eastern Canada.

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The independent monitor for Canada's grain handling and transportation system says the legislation designed to help issues with moving 2013's record crop is making a difference.

Mark Hemmes is the president of Quorum Corporation.

He says things are moving smoothly for a majority of shippers today -- but he notes there are still some small issues left to deal with.

Hemmes says for the people who sell grain in smaller blocks of rail cars, there are still some challenges going down into the U.S.

He notes there are also issues over moving milling products into Eastern Canada.

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Alberta Agriculture wants to make it easier to report sightings of rats in the hope of keeping the destructive rodents out of the province.

The government has set up a toll-free hotline -- it's 310-RATS.

The province prided itself for being rat-free for decades, but faced unusual infestations in southeastern Alberta in 2012 and last year.

Norway rats are considered to be extremely destructive with the potential to ruin crops and spread disease.

 

 

 


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