Country 105

 

     
Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Positive Crop Outlook for Farmers

By Manny Paiva

Prices for wheat, field peas, Durham, canola and malt barley are all heading up.


Length: 1:02

Good news for grain farmers.

The price outlook for the new crop year beginning August 1st is on the rise.

The Canadian Wheat Board says the wheat returns are as much as 3 dollars a tonne higher.

Market analyst Dave Simonot says the rise was driven up by concern for the hard red winter crop in the U-S, which has suffered from dry conditions.

The latest outlook for field peas has risen 18 dollars per tonne.

Durham is up as much as 11 dollars a tonne, while malt barley and canola are up 10 dollars a tonne.

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Discontent over the grain backlog could translate into votes against the government.

Federal N-D-P leader Tom Mulcair says he gets the sense that people are growing disenchanted with the Conservatives over issues such as the grain transportation backlog.

Mulcair spoke in Saskatchewan on Friday.

Mulcair says he is confident the party can recapture most of Saskatchewan's seats, despite not winning any in the province since 2004.

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The Public Health Agency of Canada says a salmonella outbreak is linked to the consumption of dried sprouted chia seed powder and dried chia seeds.

A recall has been issued for various products containing sprouted chia seeds from Advantage Health Matters.

They were sold under the brands Organic Traditions and Back 2 the Garden.

The outbreak has left nine people sick in three provinces.

Chia seeds have been touted as a nutrition supplement that help in weight loss.

>>>

Officials in California are blaming medical marijuana farms for some river pollution and water shortages.

One supervisor says some farmers are damming creeks and mixing prohibited fertilizers into watersheds.

Many affected waterways contain endangered salmon, steelhead and other creatures protected by state and federal law.

But pot farmers believe they are being unfairly blamed for killing salmon -- they put the blame on timber cutting and overfishing.

 

 


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