Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Canadian Dairy To Compete

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A report pushes to open the dairy industry to the US


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A report says Canada's dairy industry should prepare to compete with cheaper U-S products.

The Frontier Centre developed the report -- which states there is a growing push from the international community to open up markets for agricultural products.

The report says Canada's dairy industry can handle such competition.

But it says it first must open up the domestic dairy market, invest in research and develop lower cost feed.

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An old program from Ontario Pork is being revived.

The Donate A Hog program was first introduced in 1998.

It's now back again and runs until September.

All the money raised goes to the Ontario Association of Food Banks.

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There are high hopes that a visit by Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz will lead to a bumper crop of new trade with Japan.

Japan is the third largest economy in the world and is Canada's second largest farm market -- worth almost four billion dollars per year.

The Canadian Cattlemen's Association hopes Japan will finally ease remaining trade restrictions on beef that were imposed following the mad cow disease scare in 2003.

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Growing food in a home garden can start even this early in the season -- but you have to start inside.

Shawn Palmer at Art Knapp Garden Centre says broccoli, cabbage, celery, tomatoes and peppers can all be planted indoors -- preferably under grow lights.

Even though the days are getting longer and warmer -- Palmer says it's still too cold to plant the seeds in the ground.

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And it appears the battle over U-S Country of Origin Labelling and its effect on Canadian products is not yet over.

The U-S government says it will appeal a World Trade Organization ruling.

Last November, a W-T-O dispute panel ruled unanimously in Canada's favour -- saying the American policy discriminates against Canadian livestock, mainly hogs and cattle.

COOL came into effect in the fall of 2008 -- and since then has cost the livestock sector hundreds of millions of dollars. 


 


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