Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Miller Heads Ag Committee

By

Larry Miller appointed Chair of Standing committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food


Length:


A local MP has won re-election as chair of the Standing committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Larry Miller says it is an honour to be re-elected to the role by his peers.

The Bruce Grey Owen Sound Conservative MP has been an active member of this committee since 2004 and was elected as Chairman in 2008.

The committee is responsible for studying the administration, policy development and budgetary estimates of the department and organizations that are part of this portfolio.

----------

There is an invasive species workshop tonight for farmers.

You can learn about different species and how you can remove the pesky plants.

It takes place at 6 o'clock at the Everdale farm in Hillsburgh.

The cost is 15 dollars.

Farmers will also get a ground cover and invasive species identification book.

----------

New research suggests Canadian farmers seem to be dodging the worst impacts of climate change and may even benefit from it.

Stanford University researcher David Lobell says global warming has already begun to slow harvest growth rates almost everywhere in the world -- except in Canada and the United States.

His study calculates that about 6.4 per cent of global price increases for farm commodities is due to climate change.

But because Canadian yield gains aren't being slowed yet -- Lobell says Canadian farmers get to reap the benefits without paying the price.

---------

Continuing rain is causing problems for southern Alberta farmers.

Alberta Agriculture estimates about 60 per cent of farmland is seeded.

That compares to the five year average of about 70 per cent for this time of the year.

--------

Saskatchewan Agriculture says more than 80 per cent of the 2011 crop has been seeded.

The five year average for this time of year is approximately 90 per cent seeded.

---------

A researcher at Stanford University says Canadian farmers are dodging the worst impacts of climate change.

David Lobell says global warming has slowed harvest growth rates almost everywhere in the world -- except in Canada and the United States.

He estimates about 6.4 per cent of global price increases for farm commodities is due to climate change.


 


Bayshore Broadcasting Corporation
© 2018 Bayshore Broadcasting Corporation

Web Site by Websmart Inc