Country 105

 

     
Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Controlling Food Supply

By

NDP Critic concerned about food supply, genetically modified crops.


Length:

The N-D-P's agriculture critic before the last federal election says Canada's new Parliament has to have a frank discussion about the country's food strategy.

Alex Atamanenko says while Canada is an exporting nation, it needs to have more control over its own food supply.

He also remains concerned about the introduction of new genetically modified crops.

His private member's bill -- which was defeated last fall -- would have required analysis of market acceptance before a new G-M crop could be commercialized.

Ron Bonnett -- the head of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture -- says he is looking forward to having discussions with the new Official Opposition.

Bonnett thinks many of the party's agriculture policies are focused on the organic market and he wants to make sure New Democrats understand that is just a small part of Canadian agriculture.

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All the water on the ground continues to slow the progress of farmers in Saskatchewan.

The government's weekly crop report says less than one per cent of the 2011 crop has been seeded so far.

A snowstorm that whipped through parts of the province last weekend has not helped matters.

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Livestock producers in Saskatchewan who lost animals in last weekend's blizzard are covered under the province's disaster assistance program.

The aid is available only to those in municipalities that declared disasters and then only for uninsured losses.

Those making a claim will have to provide photos of the dead animals and they must also note the time, date and location where the animals were discovered.

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The heavy winter snow pack appears to have provided the perfect protection for a hungry pest -- voles.

Voles are similar to mice, but eat only plants or bark.

Pest control experts say they've been getting a steady stream of calls about them from homeowners in Regina who are wondering what's been eating their lawns.

The snow protects voles over the winter from predators.

 

 


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