Country 105

 

     
Country 105

Country 105


Agriculture Report

Optimism for Young Farmers

By

MP Larry Miller surprised by young farmers concerns.


Length:

The Bruce Grey Owen Sound MP and Chair of the Federal Agriculture Committee hopes to present a report on young farmers some time next week.

Larry Miller says they now are putting together their report on the future of farming following a cross country consultation with farmers.

He says the committee heard farmers want a level playing field so they can compete with imported food products.

Miller says the major concern many of the farmers told the committee surrounded the availability of low interest rate loans to either purchase their first farm, new equipment or expand their operation.

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Cattle producers are being reminded that bar-coded dangle tags will be de-listed on July 1st.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says all cattle must be tagged with radio frequency identification or R-F-I-D tags prior to moving from their current location or leaving their farm of origin.

The technology will make it easier for governments to trace where animals come -- a measure that is expected to make it easier to export beef to some countries.

The Canadian Cattle Identification Agency says the technology is critical for improving traceability.

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Two brothers who grow strawberries in the Niagara region predict that consumers could be enjoying fresh berries in season from May to Thanksgiving and beyond.

Traditional strawberry season had already been extended from June to late August with the introduction of day-neutrals several years ago.

The production system involves the use of floating row covers to promote late plant development and flower bud initiation for an early spring harvest.

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Agriculture Canada officials say they are looking at developing conservation measures to preserve the native bee population.

Research biologists say habitat destruction, pesticide use and diseases have lead to a drastic decrease in the number of bees in Canada.

Biologists say most fruit, vegetables and seed crops depend on bees for pollination and no less than 90 commercially grown food crops in Canada rely on the buzzing critters.

 

 


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